PORKY’S CHARCOAL AND HARDWOOD SMOKING GUIDE

CALL IT BBQ, BARBECUE, OR BARBEQUE, WE HAVE THE BEST BBQ RIBS, BBQ SAUCE AND BBQ RECIPES ANYWHERE

 
Porky’s Complete BBQ Smoking Guide
GRAB A BEER AND GET READY TO START LEARNING ABOUT BBQ SMOKOLOGY !

CHARCOAL, WOOD OR BOTH?
A wood smoker is and will forever be the best way to smoke meat. There is a bit of a learning curve if you are used to using a charcoal, gas or electric smoker but the results are worth the time and effort you put into learning this fine art.

Any hardwood is fine, but evergreen trees like fir, spruce, pine, or others cause problems. They contain too much resin and the finished product has a turpentine flavor to it. It also develops a black color due to the extra soot from the smoke, which in turn makes the smoker dirtier, too. And of course you cannot use any wood that was previously pressure treated, painted, or commercially manufactured.

Some people are adamant about removing the bark from smoke wood, believing that it introduces an undesirable flavor to their barbecue. On the other hand, I know of one gentleman who barbecues using only the bark. I don't bother removing bark from my smoke wood. You'll have to try it both ways and see if you can tell any difference.

I think the biggest mistake pit masters make in using a wood burning smoker is in building too big of a fire. I have always recommended starting with around three sticks of wood and using proper air flow to maintain a 220 F to 240 F degree temperature.

I generally start with the exhaust opened all or almost all the way and the inlet open about a third of the way. This induces proper air flow and allows the burning wood to become a hot bed of coals that will remain at a constant temperature for several hours with minimal maintenance.

Proper air flow is imperative to preventing creosote from building up on the meat and on the inside of the wood smoker. The smoke must be allowed to move into the smoker kissing the meat gently as it passes over and then be allowed to escape effortlessly thru the full open exhaust.

In the event that the smoker gets out of control you can spray the coals with some water to cool it down but be careful to not stir up the coals or you will have ashes all over your precious meat.

Experience will be the best teacher in the proper use of your wood smoker and you will soon discover what you and your family like best.

IF YOU ARE USING CHARCOAL
As many of you know, I heartily recommend lump charcoal instead of briquettes for best flavor as well as performance. Lump charcoal burns hotter and is free of a lot of the additives that are generally found in briquettes. It does have its' downsides like being more expensive and often it burns up faster than briquettes. So, having said that, should you use charcoal, wood, or both in your smoker? Once again, this depends on you and your smoker.

I have experimented some using all wood in small to medium sized smokers and I have to say that it is very easy to produce a "too smoky" flavor. I reserve the all wood scenario for my larger smoker and use charcoal with wood chunks or chips in my smaller smokers. In medium sized smoker, you may be able to get by with getting a good coal bed started and then adding small splits of wood to the coals for your smoke if you pay close attention to your air flow. The goal is to impart a mild smoky flavor, not a “burnt wood” taste, to your meat.

FINAL TIPS FOR SMOKING SUCCESS 
Monitor temperature by adding 8 to 10 fresh briquettes at a time. Do not add "instant-start" charcoal briquettes during the cooking process. And NEVER use liquid charcoal starter unless you want your meat to taste like lighter fluid!

Keep the heat at about 225 F and resist the temptation to constantly peek under the hood. Heat and smoke escape each time you open the lid, sacrificing aroma and flavor while extending the cooking time. Remember, barbeque is a “low and slow” process.

Start with a small amount of wood to see how you like the flavor, then add more for a more intense smoky taste. Don't overdo it though, and don't add wood after the first half of the smoking process. Adding wood too late can impart a bitter flavor to the meat and ruin your barbecue. No one wants to eat ribs that taste like creosote!

Because a pan full of charcoal produces a limited supply of heat, you will need to preserve as much heat inside the cooker as possible. Heat will be lost by removing the lid to check your food, so resist this temptation as much as possible. Excessive wind will also make the charcoal burn faster, so try to place your smoker where wind is minimized. If necessary, you can build a temporary windbreak to help control the loss of heat created by the wind chill factor. This is important since temperatures must be in the 225 F to 250 F to properly smoke your meat. Remember, as the air temperature falls, the chilling effect of any wind that is present increases as does your fuel consumption.

When smoke cooking large quantities of food, be careful to adjust the airflow vents so that the fire will not cook too hot and burn out too soon.  Never close the airflow vents completely unless you want to extinguish your fire. You can monitor your cooking temperature with a temperature gauge inserted in the lid of the smoker. If a temperature gauge is not included with the model you purchase, buy one where you bought your smoker or order one. When cooking large cuts of meats such as turkeys, hams and large roasts, place the food at the far end of the cooking chamber away from the fire. This will allow the food to smoke cook more slowly over a longer period of time. If the temperature begins to decline before you have finished the smoking process, add more fuel until the temperature rises to the desired level.  CONTINUED ...BBQ_MEAT_SMOKING_GUIDE_4.htmlshapeimage_2_link_0


THE BBQ GRILL
GRILLING VS BBQ
DIRECT VS INDIRECT
BBQ BASICS 101
CHOOSING A SMOKER
SMOKING ON GRILLS
FIRE STARTERS
BBQ FUELS
CHARCOAL GUIDES
FOIL PACKS
HEAT CONTROL
BBQ SMOKOLOGY
KEEPING IT CLEAN
FOOD SAFETY GUIDE
HOW TO BBQ VIDEOS
BBQ RECIPES
BBQ RUB RECIPES
BBQ SAUCE RECIPES
BBQ BEEF RECIPES
BBQ CHICKEN RECIPES
BBQ PORK RECIPES
BBQ RIBS RECIPES
BBQ SEAFOOD
BBQ TURKEY RECIPES
SALADS
SIDE DISHES
STARTERS
DESSERTS
KOOL DRINKS
PORKY’S BBQ BABES













THE_BBQ_GRILL.htmlGRILLING_VERSUS_BBQ.htmlDIRECT_VS_INDIRECT_BBQ.htmlBBQ_BASICS_SMOKING_101.htmlCHOOSING_A_BBQ_SMOKER.htmlBBQ_SMOKING_ON_GRILLS.htmlBBQ_FIRE_STARTERS.htmlBBQ_FUELS_1.htmlBBQ_CHARCOAL_GUIDES.htmlBBQ_FOIL_PACKS.htmlBBQ_TEMPERATURE_CONTROL.htmlBBQ_MEAT_SMOKING_GUIDE_1.htmlKEEPING_YOUR_BBQ_SMOKER_CLEAN.htmlBBQ_FOOD_SAFETY_GUIDE.htmlHOW_TO_BBQ_VIDEOS.htmlBBQ_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_RUBS.htmlBBQ_SAUCES.htmlBBQ_BEEF_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_CHICKEN_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_PORK_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_RIBS_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_SEAFOOD_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_TURKEY_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_SIDES_AND_SALADS_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_SIDES_AND_SALADS_RECIPES.htmlBBQ_STARTERS_AND_APPETIZERS_RECIPES.htmlDELICIOUS_DESSERTS_RECIPES.htmlKOOL_DRINKS.htmlPORKYS_HOT_BIKINI_BABES.htmlshapeimage_3_link_0shapeimage_3_link_1shapeimage_3_link_2shapeimage_3_link_3shapeimage_3_link_4shapeimage_3_link_5shapeimage_3_link_6shapeimage_3_link_7shapeimage_3_link_8shapeimage_3_link_9shapeimage_3_link_10shapeimage_3_link_11shapeimage_3_link_12shapeimage_3_link_13shapeimage_3_link_14shapeimage_3_link_15shapeimage_3_link_16shapeimage_3_link_17shapeimage_3_link_18shapeimage_3_link_19shapeimage_3_link_20shapeimage_3_link_21shapeimage_3_link_22shapeimage_3_link_23shapeimage_3_link_24shapeimage_3_link_25shapeimage_3_link_26shapeimage_3_link_27shapeimage_3_link_28shapeimage_3_link_29